Pucci

Pucci. The name is synonymous with bold color, incredible patterns and jet set sophistication.

Emilio Pucci was a fashion designer with no apparent background in design. He was an Italian aristocrat, living it up in Florence. Pucci designed clothing for the social set that reflected the post-war desire for travel and status symbols. His patterns were unlike anything before: inspired by Italian life and the bright colors of the Mediterranean. Pucci designs are arguably the most identifiable prints in fashion – dynamic, intricate and fantastical. Psychedelic swirls, stylized florals and bold abstract designs comprise the Pucci look. The colors are always intense: turquoise blue, flamingo pink, chartreuse green, sunshine yellow.

 

Emilio Pucci

 

Emilio Pucci designed his first scarf in 1949, based on a map of Capri. After that he was prolific in creating patterns and even more so conjuring up explosive combinations of color. He added his signature “Emilio” to every print. This became a easy way to identify a true Pucci piece.

 

Pucci artwork for scarves

 

Pucci scarves

 

 

I think most design people who love color love Pucci. The prints are simply infectious with their celebration of color and crazy exuberance. I think I first discovered Pucci at a New York flea market with my parents. I came across a Pucci men’s tie and was just transfixed by the colors and amazing feeling in this little piece of fabric. I begged my father to buy it for me. He kindly gave in to my sudden obsession, and this may have been the beginning of my own journey with textile collecting and pattern design.

 

Pucci

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